save energy

For a majority of homeowners, the monthly utility bill is one of the major contributors to household expenses. Regardless of whether you have high-energy consumption, reducing your energy usage will not just lower your carbon footprint but is also a great money saving strategy as well.

Here are some handy energy saving tips that will help you make small changes so that you can reduce big bills. For the best results, implement more than one method and watch your costs come down significantly.   

  1. Get Energy Monitoring

Energy monitoring is a great way to increase energy efficiency. It is a home energy management system that employs smart technology to help you monitor and control your energy output.  The money saving meter provides you with vital information on where you’re utilising the most and least energy. So, you can identify areas of improvement and bring down your overall costs.

Castle Hill Electrician Pros are the leading professional residential electrical contractors in Sydney. In addition to installing the most efficient energy monitoring systems, they also have a range of comprehensive electrical services as well at affordable prices. So, if you want to reduce your electricity bill, get in touch with them. With round-the-clock services and fast response times, they are always on the ball.

  1. Install A Programmable Thermostat

 The biggest contributor to electricity bills is heating and cooling, which are dependant on prevalent temperatures and individual preferences. Sure, by reducing the number of times you turn the thermostat up or down, you will save energy. But to optimise your savings, consider installing a programmable thermostat.

With this device, you can set the temperature according to the weather, which will allow the thermostat to make changes automatically. As a result, this will decrease your energy consumption and consequently reduce big bills.

  1. Lower The Temperature On The Water Heater

 Since water heaters distribute hot water to showers, sinks, dishwashers and washing machines, they are very heavy on electricity. Turning down the temperature on your heater even by a few degrees will help you decrease your energy usage.

Usually, the ideal temperature for heaters is 120 degrees Fahrenheit or an equivalent of 48.9 degrees Celsius. In case you’re out of town for a few days, turning off the heater will help you save even more.

  1. Install Energy-efficient Lighting

Switching to energy-efficient lighting is one of the best ways to slash energy bills. Did you know that lighting can contribute to as much as 50% of your total energy bill? And traditional incandescent or halogen bulbs especially use a considerable amount of energy.

Lighting specialists, Conservergy, recommend using LED lights, which can save you up to 80% more power than traditional fluorescent bulbs. In essence, you could reduce big bills by simply switching to more efficient lighting solutions, and they last longer as well.

  1. Switch Off Appliances When Not In Use

 Not many people are aware that everyday appliances like microwaves, televisions, dishwashers, laundry machines and phone charges utilise energy even when they’re not in use.

All gadgets and equipment when plugged in, bleed energy, which adds up to the total monthly electricity costs. Ensuring that the switches are off when the appliances aren’t being used is a simple but highly effective energy and money saving hack.

  1. Wash Clothes In Cold Water

 Running washes consumes a surprisingly large amount of energy. While we can’t do without our washing machines, there is a way to make the process more energy-friendly.

The water heater, which raises the temperature of the water, utilises a significant amount of energy. Warm water isn’t required for all clothing, so it’s wasted on daily laundry that doesn’t need the special treatment. The less the heater is employed, the more energy you save. By altering the temperature of the wash setting to cold and by choosing an eco-setting, if your machine has the option, you essentially reduce big bills and will realise considerable savings in the long run.

About the Author: This article is written by Luci Aldrin, a part time writer for Conservergy and full-time conservationist. She guest writes for a wide range of publications surrounding environmental sustainability and energy conservation.